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  • Video

    Digitising Note taking Accommodations: Revolutionising the Way Students Work with Spoken Information

    This webinar was hosted by ADCET and the Australian Tertiary Education Network on Disability (ATEND) in February, 2018. Jim Sprialis presented this webinar and described how students who require digital note taking accommodations are utilising Sonocent Audio Notetaker for Windows and Mac to address their barriers to taking effective notes.

  • Article

    Universal Design for Learning. A Best Practice Guideline - Ireland

    These guidelines (developed in Ireland) outline UDL principles and address a wide range of readers, with different experiences, roles, attitudes and ideas about how to address student diversity.  There are seven guidelines that discuss important aspects of introducing UDL as a key concept for creating inclusive learning

  • Web link

    Mental health conditions toolkit - UK

    The aim of this toolkit is to help staff to support students with mental health conditions in universities. The toolkit provides information which can be used by all university staff to increase knowledge, understanding and confidence, in order to help students maximise their academic potential.

  • Video

    Using Read&Write at University

    A number of short videos showing how Read&Write can be used in the university setting.

  • Article

    Table 4: ‘To-do list’ (blank)

    How to transition to tertiary education. Helpful hints for people with autism spectrum disorder - Table 4.

    Download: Table 4 (doc)
    Download: Table 4 (pdf)
  • Article

    The Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education (Spring 2017)

    This edition of the Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education brings together a range of articles from academics, researchers and from disability and inclusivity practitioners.

    Articles include:

    • Body size and higher education: the experiences of an academic with dwarfism. Erin Pritchard
    • Improving the support for disabled research degree students. Lucy Davies
    • A narrative of the role of the learning support assistant and the impact on their professional identity. Heidi Waywell
    • Busting the barriers to inclusive learning environments. Ivan Newman & Dr John Conway
    • Peer-to-peer success… celebrating diversity! Alice Speller, Jamie Crabb & Adam Hyland
    • Using the student voice to question the practice of inclusivity. Dr Regina Karousou
    • The value of Dyslexic Culture within our society. Katherine Hewlett
    • Book review: Study skills for students with dyslexia: support for specific learning differences (SpLDs). Edited by Sandra Hargreaves and Jamie Crabb. Izzy Isgate
  • Article

    The Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education (Winter 2017)

    This edition of the Journal of Inclusive Practice in Further and Higher Education brings together a range of articles from academics, researchers and from disability and inclusivity practitioners.

    Articles include:

    • Disabled Student Support for England in 2017. How did we get here and where are we going? A brief history, commentary on current context and reflection on possible future directions. Lynn Wilson and Professor Nicola Martin
    • Inclusive Teaching and Learning: What’s Next? E.A. Draffan, Abi James and Nicola Martin
    • Perspectives, Challenges and Opportunities: the Role of Assistive Technology Specialists within Universities in England. Gemma Holtam and Rob McLaren
    • Sisyphus vs Hercules: A Year in the Life of Implementing HEI Inclusivity Projects. Ivan Newman and Dr John Conway
    • Lecture Capture for Disabled Students: Asset or additional hurdle? Ros Walker and Rachael Whittles
    • Inclusively Enhancing Learning from Lecture Recordings. Professor Mike Wald and Dr Yunjia Li 
    • The Improvement of Silent Reading Strategies through SuperReading. Professor Francesca Santulli and Dr Melissa Scagnelli 
    • An investigation into Academic staff perceptions of the dynamics and relationship with the learning support assistant. Heidy Waywell
    • Part Two: Narrative Articles
    • It’s Just Good Practice Isn’t It? Reflections on the Journey Away from Disabled Students’ Allowances at the University of Leeds. Jenny Brady and Claire Flegg
    • Canine Assisted Learning: Exploring Perceptions of Disabled University Students. Is there Really a ‘Jack Effect’? J Faithful and C Atherton
    • Book Review: Justice for Laughing Boy: Connor Sparrowhawk - A Death by Indifference. Review by Nicola Martin
    • Article Review: Encouraging disabled leaders in higher education: recognising hidden talents. Review by Nick Chown
  • Article

    Under the radar: The mental health of Australian university students

    Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health has released a major report that shows that while Australia provides world-class education and is an international leader in youth mental health, the mental health of university students has been largely ignored.

    Titled ‘Under the Radar: The mental health of Australian university students’, the report suggests a lack of government policy attention and resources directed to this issue has impacted on the capacity for both the university and the mental health sectors to effectively respond to the needs of this group.

  • Article

    An Australian study of graduate outcomes for disadvantaged students

    The study provides critical insights into how access to higher education does, or does not, lead to improvements in post-graduation equity. The study reveals that outcomes are not equal for all students and that higher education disadvantage persists for many students after they have completed their studies. Whilst the specific findings relate to the Australian university sector the broader discussion of the article is relevant to higher education policy more generally, especially in terms of how governments align institutional processes to measure and scrutinise achievement in relation to public policy objectives. (Journal of Further and Higher Education. Published online: 20 Jul 2017)

  • Article

    VET student outcomes 2017

    VET student outcomes 2017 presents information from the National Student Outcomes Survey on the outcomes of students who completed their vocational education and training (VET) in Australia during 2016. The publication reports the outcomes of students in receipt of Commonwealth or state funding and those who paid for their training by other means.

    Summary of VET Students with disability data

     

     

    Table 7       Outcomes and satisfaction for graduates, by student characteristics, 2017 (%)

     

    Employed after
    training

    Improved employment status after training

    Employed or
    in further
    study

    Achieved their main reason
    for doing the training

    Satisfied with
    the overall quality of
    training

     

     

     

     

     

     

    With a disability

    53.7

    41.0

              73.2

    75.5

    85.7

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Table 8       Outcomes and satisfaction for subject completers, by student characteristics, 2017 (%)

     

    Employed after
    training

    Improved employment status after training

    Employed or
    in further
    study

    Achieved their main reason
    for doing the training

    Satisfied with
    the overall quality of
    training

     

    With a disability

    61.3

    34.3

    63.9

    78.9

    83.7

     

    Table 11    Median annual income after training for graduates employed full-time, by student characteristics, 2017 ($)

     

    Median annual income

     

    Employed full-time
    after training

    Employed in first full-time
     job, started after training

    With a disability

    49 900

    41 500

     

     

     

     

    Table 17     Number of graduate and subject completer respondents, by key characteristics, 2017

    Student characteristics

    Graduates

    Subject completers

     

    With a disability

    10 607

    1 078

     

     

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