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  • Video

    ADCET Webinar: Dyslexia awareness month - the students' voice

    For Dyslexia Awareness month ADCET was joined by five students from Universities and TAFE’s across Australia to discuss their tertiary education journey through their lived experience with dyslexia.

    We aim to challenge your thinking, ensure you reflect on your practice and improve your knowledge around teaching and support strategies for your students with dyslexia. (October 2019)

  • Video

    ADCET Webinar: Supporting students with dyslexia at university

    This presentation gives details about a research project conducted at a regional university in Australia about how to better support university students with dyslexia by Christina Maurer-Smolder, Susan Hunt, PhD, Shane Parker and Karin Stokes, PhD. The study included a validated self-report survey (used for recruitment), student interviews and a focus group made up of staff from the university. It concludes that identification of students with dyslexia is an extremely complex issue, and the best way to support these students and other at-risk learners is to adopt principles of Universal Design. The presentation includes specific recommendations for following these principles. (October 2019)

  • Web link

    Assistive Software: Ghotit - writing and reading assistant

    Ghotit was founded by people with dyslexia. Ghotit’s mission is to improve the overall quality of life of a person with dyslexia. Ghotit is not a treatment for dyslexia. It’s a set of services that assists adults and kids to overcome their writing and reading difficulties by helping to convert their poorly spelled written limitations to mainstream English. The software includes advanced writing and reading assistive technologies tailor-made for people with dyslexia and dysgraphia:

  • Web link

    Dyslexia Awareness: Microsoft course

    Microsoft and Made By Dyslexia have a shared mission to empower every person with dyslexia to reach their potential, and we have partnered to create tools to help make this happen.

    The objectives of the course are: To empower teachers and parents to understand dyslexia, both it’s strengths and challenges; To gain essential knowledge in how to recognize and support dyslexia; How to create a dyslexia-inclusive classroom; and, To know when and where to seek further help.

    The five modules cover: What is dyslexia?; Dyslexic thinking skills; Indicators of dyslexia; Dyslexia inclusive classroom; and, Importance of identification.

  • Article

    Dyslexia Resource Guide

    This resource aims to assist practitioners working in Disability Services within the tertiary sector who are responsible for planning and implementing reasonable adjustments for students with dyslexia, including assistive technology. The resource also provides a legislative framework, information about dyslexia and reasonable adjustments, case studies and further information and resources. The resource was developed by NDCO Program for Region 11 and 13 in partnership with IMVC and consultant Martin Kelly.

  • News item

    Dyslexie Font on ADCET

    October is Dyslexia Awareness month and over the next four weeks ADCET will be using the Dyslexie font as the default font on the website. From November onwards, website visitors will then have the option to choose between the normal font and the Dyslexie font - font options can be found in the top right-hand side of the website.

    Christian Boer, the creator of Dyslexie font, has been affected by dyslexia for as long as he can remember. His experience inspired him to design a solution to improve readability for people with dyslexia. Christian combined his graphic design skills with his dyslexia, abandoning traditional typeface design rules, favouring instead the user needs of a dyslexic person. The result? The Dyslexie font.

  • News item

    Podcast: Christian Boer Founder and creator of Dyslexie Font

    Christian Boer the Founder and creator of Dyslexie Font talks to Shae Wissell from Dear Dyslexic.

    Christian has been affected by dyslexia for as long as he can remember, this experience inspired him to design a solution to improve readability for people with dyslexia – the Dyslexie Font. Christian combined his graphic design skill with his dyslexia, abandoning traditional typeface design rules, favouring instead the user needs of a dyslexic person.

  • Article

    Report: Evaluating the effectiveness of support interventions for dyslexic learners in multiple learning environments - NZ

    This report is a culmination of a two-year project to evaluate and report on interventions that work best for adult learners with dyslexia.

  • Web link

    SpLD Awareness and Inclusion Training - UK

    This is a series of short, interactive online training resources for university staff which are designed to increase awareness of Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD) in Higher Education.

    The training resources: give staff an overview of each SpLD and the ways each of them overlap and co-occur; outline some of the difficulties that students with SpLDs can experience in HE; and, introduce staff to some of the key principles of inclusive curriculum design, curriculum delivery and assessment, and give them practical ideas to use to ensure accessibility.

    The online training covers Dyselxia, Dyspraxia, ADHD, Dyscalculia and Dysgraphia.

  • Web link

    Understood: Apps to Help Students With Dysgraphia and Writing Difficulties

    Technology can be a great tool for students (and adults!) who have learning disabilities like dysgraphia or dyslexia that affect their written expression. The apps have been personally reviewed and have been judged as LD-friendly. They can make the writing process a bit easier and even fun! Not every app will be a “perfect fit” for everyone who has LD, but with a little testing, you can figure out which one works best for your child or teen’s individual needs.