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  • Article

    2018 Vision Australia Report: Online, but off-track

    2018 Vision Australia Report: Barriers to Online Learning Experienced by University Students who are Blind or Have Low Vision.

    Universities across Australia are failing to adequately address the needs of students who are blind or have low vision according to new research conducted by Vision Australia and endorsed by Disability Discrimination Commissioner Alastair McEwin.

    In the past few years, online learning has emerged as an increasingly important method for universities to provide course content. However, the increase in online learning environments has not be designed to include all students and accessibility is a growing concern.

  • Video

    ADCET Webinar: 2018 Vision Australia Report - Online, but off-track

    During this webinar Bruce Maguire outlines and discusses the findings of Vision Australia’s research into the significant barriers to online learning experienced by university students who are blind or have low vision. (May 2020)

    Download: Transcript
  • Video

    ADCET Webinar: Accessible Assessments for Students with Vision Impairment

    This webinar looked at the Round Table’s (Round Table on Information Access for People with Print Disabilities) Guidelines for Accessible Assessment. The updated guidelines were launched in May 2019 and contain recommendations designed to make assessment materials accessible to students of all ages and levels of education. A copy of the guidelines can be downloaded from: http://printdisability.org/guidelines/guidelines-for-accessible-assessment-2019/(November 2019)

    Download: Transcript
  • Video

    ADCET Webinar: COVID-19 & Beyond: Perspectives from University Students

    In this webinar a panel of university students with disability share how COVID-19 disruptions impacted on their studies.  Hear about their challenges, the successful strategies and coping skills they used, the unexpected benefits they discovered, and what they want to take forward.  Students also share their thoughts, insights and suggestions for on-line learning. (September 2020)

  • Web link

    Access to Graphics in Higher Education

    “Improving vision impaired student’s access to graphics in higher education”  investigates the level and type of access that vision impaired students gain to graphic components of their study materials in higher education in Australia, to uncover any barriers to access and inclusion, and to offer strategies and resources to enable improved access to graphics for blind and vision impaired students. The project consisted of three major stages:

    • Data-gathering: What access do vision impaired students currently have to graphics in higher education? What are the barriers to access? The questions were explored through a national online survey of 72 vision impaired students in higher education, along with 41 semi-structured interviews with students, their disability advisors, academics and accessible formats producers.
    • Pilot studies: Working closely with vision impaired students and associated staff to trial processes and technologies over three semesters in 2015 and 2016.
    • Synthesis: All study participants were invited to a full day workshop at which they developed and refined a set of model principles for improving vision impaired students’ access to graphics in higher education.

    The results of stages 1 and 2 are reported in “Understanding the graphical challenges faced by vision-impaired students in Australian universities”, Higher Education Research & Development, May 2016.

  • Web link

    Accessibility of Virtual Reality Environments

    University of Melbourne developed information on virtual reality environments and the pros and cons for mobility, hearing, cognition, low vision, blindness, olfactory and older users.

  • Article

    Accessible Physics Concepts for Blind Students

    Professor Baldwin believed that students who are blind should not be excluded from physics courses because of inaccessible textbooks, created modules for the main physics concepts in a format that blind students can read using accessibility tools such as an audio screen reader and an electronic line-by-line Braille display. These modules are intended to supplement and not to replace the physics textbook.

  • Web link

    Accessible Physics Concepts for Blind Students - US

    An open access online tutorial for the main physics concepts in a format that blind students can read using accessibility tools such as an audio screen reader and an electronic line-by-line Braille display. These modules are intended to supplement and not to replace the physics textbook.

  • Web link

    Aira - Visual Interpreter for the blind

    Aira is a service that connects blind and low-vision people to highly trained, remotely-located agents. Through an app on your smartphone, or through an optional pair of Horizon Smart Glasses, Aira delivers instant access to visual information at the touch of a button – enhancing everyday efficiency, engagement, and independence. Straightforward and simple.

  • Web link

    Amazing Space: Tactile Astronomy

    This section of Amazing Space features a library of selected Hubble images that can be printed in a tactile format.

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